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Entertainment

Persona

An atmospheric production, but Persona lacks the intimacy and intensity of Ingmar Bergman's original. Laurence Green reviews.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Money & Finance

The mosquito in passive investing

Don't get caught out by not checking the details on 'safe bet' investments. Invest in what you understand, and what is understandable by you, or your advisers. Peter McGahan explains.

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0 Micro Peter McGahan
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Entertainment

Teenage Dick

A flawed but interesting modern meditation on the lust for power that manages to blend Shakespearean rhetoric with everyday speech. Laurence Green reviews Teenage Dick.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Entertainment

So Long My Son

Laurence Green reviews Wang Xiaoshuai's ambitious family chronicle of changing lives, set against the most turbulent events in recent Chinese history.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Work & Career

How colour stopped my depression

Helen Venables talks about how her passion for colour lifted her out of post natal depression and set her on the road to become managing director at House of Colour.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Money & Finance

Only one in five Brits know they pay annual pension charges

A study has found people pay on average three times more than they should have to with an average 1.09% annual charge

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Health & Wellbeing

Difficulty sleeping linked with raised risk of heart attack and stroke

"Can't sleep? Insomnia means you're at risk of heart attack and stroke," warns The Sun.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Society & Politics

Remembrance Day: the enduring nature of the first two-minute silence

The two-minute silence continues to be powerful memorial to the fallen through a simple collective act - short enough to focus the mind, but long enough to mean something. By Daniel McKay.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Entertainment

Beanpole

An absorbing, thought-provoking movie, set in post-war Leningrad, that seems like a strong contender for Best Foreign Film at the forthcoming Oscars. Laurence Green reviews.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Home & Leisure

New resources help organisations to support older people to use digital

Initiatives such as Get Online Week - the UK’s largest digital inclusion campaign - are delivering positive impacts that digital can have for older people as highlighted in a new report.

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0 Micro Gareth Hargreaves
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Relationships

Grandparents prove their worth in half-term childcare

Grandparents are providing an invaluable resource for parents during school holidays and it is estimated that grandparents providing childcare save working parents approximately £6.8 billion annually.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Relationships

Understanding Lasting Power of Attorney

Preparing for others to manage your finances should you no longer be able to take care of your own affairs

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Money & Finance

Sitting on equity - over 50s and property

The average over 50 is sitting on the equivalent of £56,574 worth of unused space in their home.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Entertainment

Master Harold ... and the boys

Master Harold ... and the boys is a salutary reminder of the evils of recent, officially sanctioned racism and retains an emotional power which is undimmed by age

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Health & Wellbeing

Electromagnetic 'bathing cap' shows promise in early Alzheimer's disease trial

"Alzheimer's breakthrough as pioneering head device 'can reverse memory loss' using electromagnetic waves," reports Mail Online. NHS Choices' news analysis service Behind the Headlines examines the science supporting the claims.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Health & Wellbeing

Truly smart homes could help dementia patients live independently

Dorothy Monekosso identifies challenges but says potential is there for genuine smart homes to help people with dementia live richer, fuller and hopefully longer lives.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Society & Politics

Baby boomers are keeping booze Britain afloat – but the young are drinking less

Emily Nicholls examines why young are drinking in less risky ways than previous generations, but older people are still continuing to drink heavily.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Health & Wellbeing

Over-75s who stop taking statins 'may raise risk of heart attack'

"Coming off statins in old age raises the risk of heart attack or stroke by around a third," reports The Sun. Behind the Headlines examines the science supporting the story.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Health & Wellbeing

TOR: an enzyme that could hold the secret to longevity and healthy ageing

Charalampos Rallis highlights how targeted clinical trials and population studies could help deliver healthy ageing and longer lifespans.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Entertainment

The Night of the Iguana

Clive Owen, returns to the London stage after an 18-year absence in James Macdonald's sluggish new production of the Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana. Laurence Green reviews.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Health & Wellbeing

Widely used class of drugs linked to dementia

"Common drugs taken by millions 'increase risk of dementia by 50%', experts warn," The Sun reports. Behind the Headlines examines the evidence behind the claims.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Entertainment

Peter Gynt

James McArdle impresses in a work that exposes the madness of a modern world where truth is subjective and everything can be viewed through the narrow prism of self. Laurence Green reviews.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Entertainment

The End of History

David Morrissey stands out as the brooding, down-to-earth idealist patriarch in this compassionate and intimate drama of a divided, dysfunctional family. Laurence Green reviews.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Entertainment

Europe

David Greig's 1994 drama remains a timely warning about the dangers of a divided Europe, writes Laurence Green.

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0 Micro Laurence Green
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Relationships

Mending broken trust

When trust is broken, it does not need to be the end of a relationship. Much can be learned from staying in a relationship and learning from the conflict situation.

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1 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Society & Politics

Most older adults feel at least 20 years younger than they are

A study of people aged 65 to 90 for Queen's University Ontario, found that for many people their age in years does not reflect the age that they really identify with, inside.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Health & Wellbeing

'Brain changes' could provide early warning sign for Parkinson's disease

"Scientists say they have identified the earliest signs of Parkinson's disease in the brain, 15 to 20 years before symptoms appear," BBC News reports.

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1 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Society & Politics

63 Up: long-running documentary series shows how reality TV should be done

63 Up is the ninth instalment in a series originally designed as a one-off special made by Granada as part of ITV’s World in Action strand. Ruth Deller explores its last appeal.

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1 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Work & Career

The retirement boredom conundrum

It takes just over one year for boredom to set in for retirees, a study has found. With skills and experience to burn, take this opportunity to rediscover who you are and what you can do.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial
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Health & Wellbeing

Can doing a daily crossword or Sudoku puzzle keep your brain young?

"Older adults who regularly do Sudoku or crosswords have sharper brains that are 10 years younger," reports the Mail Online.

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0 Micro Olderiswiser Editorial


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